Friday, 5 February 2021

Water, water everywhere.

 It is saying something about my present quality of life when a man coming to dig a hole in our drive is the most exciting thing to happen in my week/month. I think I mentioned in an earlier post that a pool of water had sprung up in front of the garage and we were having to dodge around it if we needed to get the car out. Since we have been going nowhere for months on end this hasn't been a problem. We have had so much rain that water is everywhere and I wasn't unduly concerned, the water table must be at it's highest. Did we have an underground spring? "It's annoying," I told Himself, "but it will disappear once the weather dries." But he is cut from a different cloth. He had a poke about and announced that the water was running. A phonecall to the waterboard brought a man out immediately. Leaks are taken seriously - the country is awash with them. The man tested the pool and announced that it was drinking water. Quelle horreur! Some years ago a small leak had appeared on the road outside our bolthole in the Yorkshire Dales. No great surprise given the enormous brutes of farm tractors that trundle past. That escape of water had cost us hundreds of pounds, were we in for another large bill?












The very next day a couple of men appeared with shovels. I'd already scraped some of the surface stones to one side
 













A broken old clay pot.









Himself inspects the replacement.









Excitement over, it's mended.



9 comments:

  1. If you are on a meter and the leak is outside, they discount the reading and usually write most of it off. No big bills.

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  2. Good job they were there so quickly to investigate and repair. I would be rather worried if I had a watery hole somewhere around my house, too.

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  3. We just had a very similar experience here. It's been raining, so we didn't notice the puddling of water around the meter where our water pipe meets the city water pipe. We called the city and they came to check and informed us that the leak was on our side of the valve. Bummer. We called a plumber. He came and fixed it. Now we're waiting to see what our water bill is going to look like. It was quite exciting here for a while!

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  4. That's a big bit of pot. It must have occupied most of the dug hole, which, by the way, is very tidy. The men look happy and in their element.

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  5. So pleased it has been fixed, relatively quickly it seems. Water can be a worry, we had a leak for years, and escalating water bills, before we finally figured out what needed to be fixed. Well done. I was rather hoping the clay pot might be a Roman artefact or other treasure :)

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  6. Wish we had a man come to fix our leaks. We are responsible for finding and repairing any beyond the meter, which is about quarter of a mile up the mountain. The only way we know there is a leak is when we switch the water off and the meter is still turning, then we have to search in the undergrowth for a damp area. Such is rural Italian life.

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  7. Oh I'm so glad you got that fixed! And yes, I suppose my world is just as "exciting" lol... ;)

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  8. Now you have me wondering. We were just talking about the apparent rising water table in a specific spot yesterday. Well done for Himself determining the apparent cause so you could get it fixed so quickly.

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  9. Nothing wrong about the pleasures of watching others work. The pastime is enshrined early in Wind in the Willows when Mole and Rattie go for a picnic. The unpacking of the picnic basket is lovingly detailed, after which Mole (who is Rattie's guest) volunteers to re-pack the remnants. Rattie is perfectly content to sit back and watch Mole make a real pig's arse of gathering all the scattered cutlery and crockery.

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