Friday, 22 May 2020

Food


How are you doing on the food front? If we didn't have our friends the Young and Fit to shop for us we would be on rather slim pickings. We are both in our late '70's with health conditions and supermarket delivery slots remain erratic. In our area it seems to be the small independent shops who are going all out to provide a reliable service. We've finished eating the home-grown asparagus for this season and there isn't a great deal to pick in the veg garden at the moment. The courgettes look promising and we had a couple in today's stir-fry.
Hopefully there will be plenty more to come.
The artichoke plants look very healthy
and the spuds are up.
But we shall have to wait a while for everything else.
It's Bank Holiday on Monday.
We won't be going anywhere!
But do have a lovely time.

10 comments:

  1. We order and pick up our food. We often get less than we ordered but now My Retired Man orders from two store a few days apart. A few weeks ago we would put in an order and the pick up date was two weeks later. It has gotten better and now we can get it within a week. It takes planning, but it works out for us. I am not sure if we will go back to shopping in a store again if this virus is ever over, because this is convenient and we don’t buy what looks good but don’t need.

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    1. I can't wait to get back to the shops and pick up EXACTLY what I want. However I'm not going to rush. It's a case of safety first. Our government is making a pig's ear of dealing properly with this epidemic. They should be ashamed of themselves.

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  2. My parents have most of their food stuff and ozther things delivered, and so far, it has not been a problem. When something is not available or my Mum forgot to order it, my sister fills the gap. She is not working at the moment and is actually glad to have something to do until she is allowed back to work.
    Your garden makes you largely self-sufficient, which is wonderful and makes me rather envious!

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    1. This is the between season for eating from the garden, with some things, such as purple sprouting, removed to make space for new crops that will take a while to be ready.

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  3. Your garden is wonderful, a real treat to see. We are growing a few veg in pots, but large beds would be so good. Happy isolating!

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    1. Hello Patricia, in these strange times it is a real treat just to have a garden, a safe space to be in.

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  4. Friends and family joke about us being ready for the apocalypse. Our freezers are jammed with frozen veg that we grew on the allotment or foraged, along with meat and fish that I can never resist in the discount section. Our camper van is also full of crates and crates of food. Only have to grab essentials so far. Your garden is looking lovely Rosemary. Hope you are both well.

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    1. Good to hear from you, Gary. I am longing to be in your neck of the woods to spend time with my little grandson, who is growing up quickly. Don't know when that will be!
      We are fine. I've just emptied our third freezer in the garage as, like you, we are eating our way steadily through last season's fruit and veg. However, without input from the shops, via our friends, our diet would be rather repetitive!
      I'm battling strong winds in the garden, it's done a bit of damage but most things are looking promising.

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  6. I retired in 1995, VR two years later. Where to live? Britain was our oyster for the 1930s three-bed semi we owned was in Kingston-upon-Thames and was, metaphorically, built of gold-dust.

    Suddenly we were in a palace: detached, 4 beds, integral garage. Mortgage paid off, and still there was enough to pay for carpets. We chose Hereford through ignorance, other than it was peaceful. Another word for rather dull but we were both capable of generating our own forms of stimulation independent of those around us. And gradually other benefits became apparent. Wales was next door and it was empty. The sort of place where one could still go for a drive. For pleasure! Tell that to those compressed into the KuT-Surbiton nexus.

    And Herefordshire with its sparse population (less than 200,000) is predominantly agricultural. There was no chance we would grow our own veg but then there was no need. The street markets were abundant. And asparagus - in season - ceased to be a luxury, reduced in cost to the equivalent of sprouts. Ditto globe artichokes. Strawberries - ever ripe, ever flavoury - enjoyed a phenomenally long local season which has become even longer, albeit with hillsides given over to poly-tunnels. There is always some price to be paid.

    There are still independent butchers all with some USP or other. Pickled brisket, anyone? And Welsh lamb, never previously identified by me, was surely the best in the world. Apples? Well Hereford is the HQ of Bulmers, although the range of ciders goes way beyond theirs.

    Don't get me wrong. I understand the attraction of GYO since there's an added aesthetic appeal. You eat stuff that looks well while it grows. But bad backs and weeding are mutually exclusive. One of our gardeners is a long-time enthusiast at your level, yet he must pursue his delight accompanied by continuing reminders of the body's frailties. Groaning the while.

    Was it in Hereforshire I first discovered the sweetheart cabbage?

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