Wednesday, 12 March 2014

Vegetable garden

At the beginning of the week I popped into The Pig to thank them for last Saturday's party.
I was keen to have a nose around the newly reworked vegetable garden. Last week's advertisement in the local paper said the following, so I wanted to see what was growing.
The delightful Steph, she with the lilting Irish voice, gave a warm welcome and showed us what has been done so far.
It was impressive. "How come the pigeons aren't eating your brassicas?" I wanted to know.
One of the gardeners said, "Because we are here all the time!" But I'm sure they are not working at first light when the pigeons like to come and breakfast on my greens.
They have transformed a sadly neglected space and it's a pleasure to see.
Although there is still plenty to be done. This area was a central walkway between herbaceous borders.

I've always been rather envious of these beautiful greenhouses. For years they stood neglected and unused. In the past I've sketched and painted in the garden.
Even in its neglected state it was a lovely place to be, with fragments of statuary that displayed its rather grand past.


One summer a young couple  went over the ground with a metal detector and unearthed various items. My favourite objects were these fruit tree labels with their wonderful names. I don't know whether these varieties are still in production - I wonder what a Pitmaston Duchess tastes like!
Everything was flourishing and looking so neat and tidy that I thought of my own vegetable plot with  dismay. I'm still having treatment for my neck and back following from last autumn's car crash and the poor weather has also kept me from attempting any work outside. But, if I don't set to work soon then it will be a disaster.  There is still plenty to gather and eat, parsnips and chard,
 and new season rhubarb coming up.
But, oh, what an untidy state of affairs. Things are much better in the greenhouse, buds forming on the Chinese peonies,
the auricles recovering from their attack of vine weevils,

citrus fruiting,

and the bonfire getting ever higher as I wait for the wind to start blowing from the west.
Watch out!

14 comments:

  1. What a superb veg garden - I wonder how many people it takes to keep it in that condition. Your sketches and painting are really good - what a clever lady you are. Do you keep your greenhouse heated over winter to keep the citrus trees free of frost? Once you put your mind to it I am sure it won't take too long to get your own veg plot in order, aches and pains permitting.

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    1. We had a warm welcome from the head gardener, with an invitation to pop in whenever we want, so I'll find out in due course how many people it takes to keep everything in tiptop condition.
      I've no heat in either greenhouse. If its frosty I wrap the citrus trees in fleece. They suffer in the winter months, with a black mould on their leaves which I try to wipe off with limited success. As soon as its safe to do so I put them outside, where they flourish. I try to have them outside for at least five months of the year.

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  2. That's a great garden.
    Merle.........

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    1. It's going to be great. Now I realise that what I'm most in need of is a team of gardeners!

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  3. Oh you are inspiring me! I am going to start planning my veggie garden! Can't plant till end of May, but I can dream!

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    1. No planting going on in my garden yet either, Wendy I've got to dig it first!
      Dreaming, ah, yes, we are both really good at that!

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  4. Kitchen gardens are really the best thing. Lovely sketches! Wishing you a much speedier recovery! That blue chair seems like a nice place to sit while you heal!

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    1. The blue chair may look inviting, Connie, but its still too cold and damp in the greenhouse for sitting down.
      I'm going to be pinching lots of good ideas from The Pig plot, I'm sure, although I doubt that I'll ever reach their stage of immaculate planting.

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  5. Thank you for sharing valuable information. Nice post. I enjoyed reading this post. The whole blog is very nice found some good stuff and good information here Thanks..Also visit my page greenhouse kit If you have any questions or if you need additional assistance, please feel free to contact us at anytime!

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    1. Hello and welcome, Joyti. I've had a look at your greenhouse supplies. Have to smile - the last thing that I need is a rainmaker kit! Now if you know of a dance that I can do to stop the stuff falling on my garden for more than half the year then that would be great!

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  6. If you would not have mentioned it, I would not have been able to distinguish your garden from the Pig's garden from the photos.

    After the great party I do hope the wind will blow in the right direction, when you light the bonfire. Otherwise the next round is on you ;-)

    Your glass house has the same climate as Rome: the lemons in Rome (those on the trees) looked just like your lemons in the glass house!

    I like your sketches - they could fill a third blog :-)

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    1. The climate of Rome - I wish!!
      No weeds in The Pig plot, that's the difference.
      The bonfire has been dealt with - nobody burnt to a crisp.
      Sketches - my workroom is full of them, I can't quite manage to throw anything away.

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  7. I'm so envious that you have anything green at all. And look at those citrus? Do you usually have so much fruit? I've wanted to get a Meyer Lemon but not sure where it would live in the wintertime.

    I hope we'll get peak at your bonfire!

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    1. Yes, spring is shaping up here - through the mist! I love the idea of you cherishing a Meyer but you'll note in my reply to Elaine, above, that my citrus are not very happy or healthy in the winter months when they have to be inside. Like me they hang on in there, but only just!

      Bonfire a success and photographed, just for you.

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