Wednesday, 13 January 2021

Clogs

 When we are just slipping out of the house briefly, down the path to collect the post or to the wood store for some more logs, we step out of our indoor clogs and into battered old gardening ones. We keep pairs beside all the exterior doors. The weather is poor and yesterday when we opened the kitchen door we found this bluetit taking a rest from the wind and rain inside an extremely scruffy clog belonging to Himself. We thought that it would fly away immediately but it stayed for sufficiently long for me to be concerned that it was damaged. The kitchen door has a canopy so it is a dry place to be and the little bird stayed there for quite a while as we moved past it in and out of the house. I was just starting to think that I should pick it up and check it over when it flew away.








I wore clogs as a child when playing in the garden and so did our daughters. We bought these little red ones while visiting friends in Denmark when our daughter was three. She is now forty-nine!

She loved them and staggered about in determined fashion for a while until she had mastered them, running and playing about outside. Her little sister then took them over and next in line is little sister's son.







We have had the soles replaced ready for action should he still be small enough to wear them once the virus is under control and we can enjoy family life again.

My gardening clogs by the front door, at the ready.


16 comments:

  1. Your clogs look so attractive and useful and I can imagine how good they would be to go outside. And how sweet is the little blue bird, seeking shelter. I hope it is ok out in the cold. Best of all are the little red clogs, and they must be so sturdy, lasting a long time through successive generations. I do hope they have the chance to enjoy another little owner.

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    1. Our grandson will be four in August, I am hoping we shall get to see him before then and that he won't have grown up too much!
      Our plastic clogs for the garden are anything but attractive, but they are very useful.

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  2. How sweet, but I'm happy that the little blue tit flew away at last. I would have been concerned as well, whether it was sick or not. I've got at every door garden clogs as well, but one pair was rather cheap and doesn't have any good sole and made me slip at least four or five times in the garden. Should replace them before I hurt myself seriously by kissing the ground.

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    1. The ground may not kiss but thump you instead - best to get footwear that keeps you safe, Alex. This is not the time to end up in hospital.

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  3. Aaaw, the sweet little blue tit!
    We had clogs when we were kids, with wooden soles; they could make quite a noise when we'd clap-clap along the paths around our neighbourhood. We loved them, but I must admit I preferred being barefoot altogether.

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    1. Even with rubber soles the traditional wooden clogs can still make a noise! The advantage with clogs is that you can slip them on and off at will to run through grass in your bare feet or with them on clatter over hard surfaces.

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  4. I've never had clogs. We didn't have many cobblestones either when I was little. Not proper West Riding am I?

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    1. Bye 'eck, lad, niver 'ad clogs. Call thisen a Yorkshireman!

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  5. What a delightful surprise! We have to give shoes a determined shake before donning here - our surprises come in the nasty spiders-and-snakes form.

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  6. How cute that the bird nested in your clog!!! I remember those in the 1970's, they were very fashionable and I had a pair, boy were they noisy lol...but I do love them!

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    1. Happily the bird wasn't nesting but just taking a rest,so the clog wasn't put out of action for a season! I used to have lovely bright red wooden clogs like my daughter's but these days use cheap plastic ones.

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  7. Here in Italy I wear rubber wellington clogs, brought over from the U.K. l too like to keep them outside the door to step into. In summer I check for scorpions, in winter I keep them upside down to keep the rain out.

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    1. Scorpions - yikes, you are as bad as Pip in Australia!

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  8. How sweet to find the bird in your clogs. I too have a pair of purple clogs to step out to the garden easily.

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    1. The blue tit seemed quiet content just to sit there and watch us come and go.

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