Monday, 9 July 2018

Desperate measures.

Well, that will teach me to brag about my green garden. Take a look at the lawn now!
It's not a pretty sight.


I've got very light, sandy soil. It doesn't retain moisture and in this extended heatwave established plants and even trees are dying. One of the apple trees is really suffering and has shed nearly all it's leaves.

The climbing 'Iceberg' rose has died
and many of the veg plants are struggling. I think that crops will be very poor this year.
Flowers that should be at their best are limp and fading in this unlikely temperature of nearly 30c day after day. 
We are saving all the house water that we can to put on the garden. Buckets in the kitchen and a hosepipe rigged up in the bathroom. We've jammed it in the window frame to syphon our bathwater out and under the trees. Desperate times call for desperate measures!
But some plants seem to be thriving. The sweetcorn looks good
and the hollyhock are happy.


The white foxgloves have finished flowering but I've left the flower heads on so that the seed can ripen.
It's not all bad news,
I'm still picking fruit

and it's good weather for washing sheets and blankets!
I hope your weather isn't causing you grief.

18 comments:

  1. It is very hot here but I live in a desert. Our weather patterns have changed somewhat from past years.
    We had rain yesterday but we need more.
    So Sorry about your garden. I like Hollyhocks.

    cheers, parsnip

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    1. I think it's going to be a case of adapt and survive. The sun-loving plants such as lavender are very happy. If weather patterns are changing I shall have to rethink what I grow.

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  2. We have the heat but we also have rain. Everything is green and lush but I know that can change rapidly in a week’s time. Brown grass is often the scenery in August. Your sun lovers look wonderful.

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    1. Heat AND rain - now that sounds good!
      :-)

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  3. My goodness, it must be hot over there - and it seems no time since winter was dragging on and on. It looks like our Australian garden frequently looks over Summer. But not your gorgeous foxgloves - I could never grown them here.

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    1. I enjoy the heat but not what it's doing to the garden. Because this sort of weather is so unusual for us we are ill prepared. A really deep mulch in the spring might have helped and a better rainwater saving system.

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  4. We have had temps in the high 90s and low 100s F. The heat indexes are higher. These are August temps in the southern part of the US. Luckily I have several trees giving shade to the gardens. Watering every morning is a must if I want to keep things alive. Hoping you have a break soon. Hugs!

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    1. We also have some large trees to provide shade, however I think that they are starving the smaller trees and plants around them. No sign of stress, so far, for our huge walnut tree, full of nuts, but it is giving the nearby pear tree a very hard time. I don't think that we shall be eating any home-grown pears this autumn!
      Do a rain dance for me, Bonnie!

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  5. Very hot here every summer. I water daily. Very good idea to save the house water. I've read that it is required in arid climates. We should all do that. I know people have rain barrels but I don't know anyone who saves the wastewater from the house. Looks like you'll still get quite a lot and hopefully the other things will come back.

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    1. I've got five full barrels and seven half barrels that collect rainwater from the house and outhouse roofs. All are now empty. It just isn't British! I shall remember not to moan about rain so much in the future.

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  9. Coming back to delete a few? if not all... So HOT right now. Berries are shriveling -- as much else. Only so much water to go around... Discouraging to see this trend world wide, but must keep giving it a go -- otherwise?

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    1. Oh, Wildside, so sorry that the same thing is happening to you. So many things have died in my garden - I'm never going to moan about rain again. (Remind me in the winter!)
      :-(

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  10. Hello Rosemary I have found myself to your blog via Pinterest. I was reading a blog from October 2010 in which you say you brought your Auriculas into the greenhouse for the winter. May I ask do you keep it heated at all and how often do you water them. I usually keep mine outside but lost some during last winter so I was thinking of bringing them in this year. Thank you

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    1. Hello Adena, I don't have any heat in the greenhouse but keep the auriculas inside to avoid the many months of endless rain! My 'greenhouse' is actually an extension of the garage and has a mostly solid roof so it acts quite well as a shade house and the auricles thrive there, albeit leaning a little towards the window light. I have only lost plants through my battle with the dreaded vine weevil.

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  11. Rosemary, I'm so sorry to hear about your drought! We've been short of rain with temps in the nineties for the past month, but we finally got nearly an inch the other day, which was a relief. I hope you will get several inches of rain before long -- hang in there! Best, -Beth

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