Wednesday, 25 April 2012

Home again.

Back home and the weather is atrocious, thank goodness I have a greenhouse to shelter my auriculas in. They are repaying my attention given earlier in the year to rid them of vine weevil grubs and are rewarding me with a good display of colour. The wind and rain outside would have battered them to bits and certainly washed away the rather magical farina that settles on some of the leaves and petals.


They are difficult to photograph, the colours distort and I seem unable to capture their vibrance.

I have bought one or two new plants, not out of need, you understand, but because they were such a good price! A camellia, "Lavinia Maggi' for £3 and two clematis at less than £2 apiece. I've potted them on and they are sitting it out in the greenhouse attached to the garage with a load of other things that are sheltering from the misery that is our spring weather.

One of the tree peonies that I bought last year is in flower, Ho Hung or Hu Hong, I can't remember which. I shall plant it outside once I've found a space.

In the odd little patches of sunshine between the downpours I wander round the garden in my wellington boots and look in Eeyore fashion at the bare vegetable beds. I have only managed to plant onions and potatoes so far.
The 'St Patrick's Day' daffodils, planted under the fruit trees, are lasting well because of the cold, their colour is fading as they age and they look lovely as a carpet to the emerging pear blossom.


Do you remember last year when the plum trees were so laden with fruit that branches broke with the weight? I wonder what the coming year will bring.

The flower beds are soaking up the rainfall happily enough
but not everyone's happy!

18 comments:

  1. I love your Auriculas the colours are much more subtle than primulas. I used to have some but I lost them sadly. Your garden is looking very lush and green and the daffs look lovely set in the grass. I am waiting now for the next batch of flowers to appear - if only it would warm up a bit - and stop raining of course.

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    1. The vine weevils seem to love my auriculas, Elaine, but it's a battle that i haven't lost so far!
      Rain - enough, enough!!

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  2. Everything looks lovely. As depressing as dark rainy days can be, be glad you have it as your spring garden will reap the rewards.

    We finally got some rain and are very grateful for it. Because of the dryness, fires were sprouting up all over and destroying beautiful forests and parks where we love to walk.

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    1. I shouldn't moan about our weather as it is generally kind and temperate, certainly with no frightening and destructive fires. But this is the wettest spring since our weather records began so perhaps I can be allowed a bit of complaining!

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  3. I'm going to have to look around for auriculas. I don't think I'm seen them here.

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    1. Be warned, Steve, they are addictive!

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  4. What beautiful flowers! What a bright spot with all the cold rainy weather!

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    1. I'm glad that you like them too. Most of mine are un-named, which is a pity. There are many hundreds of the named varieties and I'm on the look out for 'Yorkshire Mist.'

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  5. I have to say that those auriculas are looking superb! And just as well to have kept them in the greenhouse as the weather is really battering everything generally isn't it? The beds do look lovely and lush, as does sleepy doggy.

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    1. I think that they would have rotted away by now, Gary, if I had them outside!

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  6. I have to try my hand at Auriculas. I've always planted prim rose but I love the wonderful colors auriculas come in. I'm not certain we can grow them successfully here in Southern California. If they are like peonies and require some frost I'll be out of luck. Your garden looks lovely and I'm sure will only become more so over the next several weeks.
    Karen at Garden, Home and Party

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    1. Auriculas come from the Alpine regions of Europe, Karen, and like a cool, airy environment. They need shading from hot, summer sunlight, so it doesn't sound too promising for Southern California. (Hot summer sun is what everyone in Britain is dreaming about!)

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  7. Such colors. They looks so cute tucked inside.

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    1. Well is certainly isn't cute outside at the moment!

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  8. I don't think I have ever seen Auriculas...
    Very beautiful...love the thick leaves...
    almost like an orchid...must look them up...

    lovely photos...
    Cheers!
    Linda :o)

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    1. Hello Linda, you with the painted toenails and the heavenly cottage by the lake!

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  9. Wow your garden is awesome...i wish i have green fingers like yours. Your flowers are such beautiful "fruits"of your labour. The garden looks lush and beautiful too. Well done!

    Mongs
    mythriftycloset.blogspot.com

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    1. You are at a different stage of life, Mongs. My children are grown up and gone so I have time to poke about in the garden as much as I want - just a different form of nurturing!

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